Why the Currently-Voiceless Among Us Need to be in Charge

Another story about the ‘pregnant man,’ another several quotes from people presented as being representative of the trans community but who are not.

Case in point: an item in the current issue of the Shamvocate asking “Has Thomas Beatie’s public exposure hurt the transgender movement?”

Funny…

I don’t seem to recall the Shamvocate worrying about how the trans community would be hurt when it ran Norah Vincent’s extermination manifesto back in 2000.

And, lets not forget that the Shamvocate actually got the media ball rolling with the story of Thomas Beatie, when it ran an online item by him back in March.

But, right now, its the Shamvocate in high ‘journalism’ mode, excreting shit and passing it off as legitimacy.

Now, the current item on Beatie does have a salient observation about Beatie from Jamison Green:

“I wish he didn’t turn himself over to the media.”

But look where the article eventually goes: Shamvocate-proclaimed trans legal expertise from self-professed specialist in trans rights.

“I don’t imagine there will be negative legal consequences for [the Beaties] personally,” says Dean Spade, a lawyer who specializes in transgender rights. After all, the couple is legally married and therefore has all the parental rights a marriage provides. “The idea of someone challenging this doesn’t make sense. The biological tie is generally respected in court.” Spade adds that Beatie’s legal gender can’t be questioned, and because this is a marriage between a legal man and woman, he doesn’t see how the story could have any impact on heterosexual marriage laws in Oregon.

No negative legal consequences?

Legal gender can’t be questioned?

Doesn’t see how the story could have any impact?

Now…

Should there be consequnces?  Should Beatie’s gender be questioned?  Should it have any legal impact?

Those are different questions.

But, if Spade really believes there are no possible legal consequences (does he really think some enterprisng political opportunist – even in Oregon or, perhaps, with the feds – won’t try?), and if Spade really believes that Beatie’s legal gender can’t be questioned (it won’t even take an opportunist to arrange some venue in which Beatie’s post-transition-to-male pregnancy will yield a de novo examination of not just Beatie himself but of all statements, documents, etc., that went into getting his gender legally changed in the first instance). and if Spade really believes the story will have no legal impact on heterosexual marriage (as in whether or not an FTM can marry a woman, and whether or not an MTF can marry a man) in Oregon (yeh – I can see all that gay money and energy  to fight against legislative action ‘clarifying’ that marriages such as the Beaties’ are invalid same-sex relationships flowing into Oregon right now…NOT), then Spade has abdicated any and all right that he may have ever had to speak for anyone on trans issues – in court or anywhere else.

2 Responses to Why the Currently-Voiceless Among Us Need to be in Charge

  1. Griffin says:

    Yeah, I hate how most FTMs are acting like this is going to have no effect on anyone. This sucks a ton for me, because I haven’t had chest surgery or anything yet, so the tightening requirements (which is what I forsee) could impact me in a major way. I think this could very easily fundamentally change the way that government agencies treat us.

    This is not a new thing, it has happened quite a few times before. But since those guys didn’t wind up on Oprah (for crying out loud), it was a non-issue. Almost no one knew about it and so nothing came from it.

    I remember when Pat Califia’s husband had a baby, and that was big shit even though he hadn’t had anything done yet (ad was still legally female because of it). That had far-reaching negative effects and hurt me specifically even though I’ve never even met these people. I needed a hysterectomy very, VERY badly and was not using it for sex reassignment (as if). But the fact that an FTM had a baby was thrown in my face constantly, as a sign that I couldn’t possibly know what I wanted because some random other person didn’t know either. Completely ridiculous, but that’s what happens.

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