Why Do Republicans Keep Creating Exceptions to Godwin’s Law?

Well, in your heart, you know what the answer is.  From Raw Story:

A Republican state Senate candidate in Wisconsin called Adolf Hitler a “strong leader” in a tweet, and the action is garnering criticism from Democrats. Reports AP:

Dane Deutsch of Rice Lake posted a message on his campaign Twitter account in March that read, “Hitler and Lincoln were both strong leaders. Lincoln’s character made him the greater leader whose legacy and leadership still lives on!”

Deutsch says he meant that while both men influenced many people, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln had a “righteous character” while Hitler did not.

He added that he also “meant” that funeralistic black suits with stovepipe hats were more stylish than proto-Star Wars Empire military garb.

One Response to Why Do Republicans Keep Creating Exceptions to Godwin’s Law?

  1. Kathy says:

    Righteous character, indeed.

    The Bible is not my book nor Christianity my profession.
    — Abraham Lincoln

    My earlier views of the unsoundness of the Christian scheme of salvation and the human origin of the scriptures, have become clearer and stronger with advancing years and I see no reason for thinking I shall ever change them.
    — Abraham Lincoln,

    It will not do to investigate the subject of religion too closely, as it is apt to lead to Infidelity.
    — Abraham Lincoln

    Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes his aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God’s assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men’s faces, but let us judge not that we be not judged.
    — Abraham Lincoln, sarcasm in his Second Innaugural Address (1865)

    The United States government must not undertake to run the Churches. When an individual, in the Church or out of it, becomes dangerous to the public interest he must be checked.
    — Abraham Lincoln

    Allow the President to invade a neighboring nation whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such purpose, and you allow him to make war at pleasure….
    If today he should choose to say he thinks it necessary to invade Canada to prevent the British from invading us, how could you stop him? You may say to him, “I see no probability of the British invading us,” but he will say to you, “Be silent; I see it, if you don’t.”

    — Abraham Lincoln

    When the Know-Nothings get control, it [the Declaration of Independence] will read: “All men are created equal except negroes, foreigners and Catholics.” When it comes to this I should prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretense of loving liberty — to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure, and without the base alloy of hypocrisy.
    — Abraham Lincoln

    There was the strangest combination of church influence against me. Baker is a Campbellite; and therefore, as I suppose with few exceptions, got all of that Church. My wife had some relations in the Presbyterian churches, and some in the Episcopal churches; and therefore, wherever it would tell, I was set down as either one or the other, while it was everywhere contended that no Christian ought to vote for me because I belonged to no Church, and was suspected of being a Deist and had talked of fighting a duel.

    — Abraham Lincoln, letter to Martin M Morris (March 26, 1843)

    Gettysburg: ‘Under God’ Inserted Long After Speech Given

    We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

    — Abraham Lincoln, closing the Gettysburg Address, according to the Nicolay Draft (see photo, below), one of two that he wrote on the day he gave the address. Neither draft contains the phrase, “Under God” (quoted from a photo of the Nicolay Draft, below). Delivered at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863

    “Mr. Lincoln had no hope, and no faith, in the usual acceptation of those words.”

    — Mary Todd Lincoln

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